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Dark and Intimidating

5

Photographer Jonathan Andrew set out to photograph some of the concrete residues of World War II. Bunkers. These bunkers are scattered around the Netherlands and other places in Europe. His long exposure photos deliver an impact that somehow suits the time period in which the bunkers where used. Dark and intimidating. Almost like the feeling one would have when being at war. A great reminder that Europe has been free of war for almost 70 years. If you look around in the world at other continents, one can’t say the same. Let use Jonathan’s work as a reminder and as an inspiration for great photography.

Jonathan Andrew’s website: www.jonathanandrewphotography.com

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The Contrast in Being

The following series reminded me of a line from the song Empire State of Mind by Jay-Z: “…concrete jungle where dreams are made of…”. But this concrete jungle seems to overtake and isolate it’s creator. Let alone its dreams. The human beings stuck in between the dream and the reality. This wonderful photo series shot by Dutch photographer Job Jonathan Schlingemann gives us a glimpse into this contradicting world.  A world between beautiful geometrical shapes of the sky scraping buildings and the tiny, seemingly insignificant but nonetheless driven, people who walk among them. The artist is fascinated by the contrasts he sees:

I am fascinated by this business districts with all its concrete and geometric shapes and in between those huge buildings, the human being. This human being seems driven by a purpose; his function in this world. He seems isolated. The contrast between those two sometimes seems almost poetic.

The photographs are beautifully lit. The photographer really knows how to find that perfect moment to share his fascination. The light and the colors are just marvelous.

Job Jonathan Schlingemann’s website: www.splinter.tv

The World is Black and White

One way to approach photography could be using the Zone-System invented by Ansel Adams. When using this system one makes sure that the intended dynamic range is well-lit in your photograph. By using initially 10 steps from black to white the contrast of the image will look natural and all intended will be visible. A famous photograph of Adams was that of a small town shot by night, lit only by the moon.

Of course Ansel Adams’ work is wonderful and unique in its kind but it leaves not much to the imagination. But by blacking out areas in a photo, you can create a story and a tension that can only be filled in by the viewer. And that is exactly what Gabrielle Croppi did in his series Metaphysics of an Urban Landscape. In a way Gabrielle uses a 3 zone system. Using only black, gray and white he composes images with a high contrast. Images which are very open for interpretation. His high contrast photographs makes the usual suspects when it comes to recognizable landmarks into something that could have come straight out of a Hollywood film. Scenes loaded with drama. Scenes that reminds me of the works by the great American painter Edward Hopper.

Gabriel Croppi’s website: www.gabrielecroppi.com

Day to Night

Photographer Stephen Wilkes photographed places during both day and night. He combined the results into single images. Creating photographs that captures one location during one day. Not a slice of time, but a slice of location in a single frame. His project is called Day to Night. CBS news made a nice video about this project: Watch it here.

Stephen Wilkes’ website: www.stephenwilkes.com

Foodscapes

Landscape photography is a wonderful way of sharing natures wonders with everyone. But this type of photography is not for everyone. Often the places which are the most beautiful are secluded or are best photographed in the wee little hours in which most of us are still fast a sleep.

But some people don’t let nature decide when a landscape is ready to be photographed. Ernie Button for example. He created wonderful landscapes using cereal. In his project called Cerealism he uses the common breakfast cereal to create scenes based on their shape and texture. A wonderful and creative way to play with food. It reminded me of the works of Carl Warner. Take a look and get inspired. Perhaps your next meal will be much more interesting.

Ernie Button’s website: www.erniebutton.com

International Photography Awards 2012

Normally I don’t use PforPHOTO to talk about my own work. But today I found out that two of my photographs have been awarded an Honorable mention at the IPA, International Photography Awards 2012. Always nice to see something like that. Visit their website to see the winners and the other honorable mentions. Both professional and non-professional photographers have been awarded. So a lot of inspirational work to admire.

IPA’s website

Winner’s Gallery

Google Road Trip

The United States of America has and will always be a place that will inspire dreams and capture the imagination of many. The greatness of the land, the nature, the mixture of cultures and way of living, it all makes the USA a great place to travel around in. A country made for an epic road trip.

Unfortunately not everybody will be able to travel around in this vast part of the world. But fortunately Google Maps makes it possible to wander around in neighborhoods and trough the states of the Americas from the comfort of your own home. Doug Rickard undertook a trip that lasted around two years. He looked for places with vivid colors and certain compositions. Many have compared it with the works of Stephen Shore and William Eggleston. Some of the photos even remind me of paintings by Edward Hopper. Rickard’s series’ called “A New American Picture”. He lets us see a glimpse of americana by using a service meant for many things. And like all artist he makes us look differently at what is in front of us. On the screen and on the streets. So next time you find yourself traveling on your computer, think about Doug Rickard’s wonderful photo series.

Doug Rickard’s website: www.dougrickard.com

Constructed Landscapes

Photography has long surpassed the field of merely capturing reality. Ever since Man Ray, artist have used the camera like a painter uses his brush. What we see is never truly what is really going on. Take the work of Edwin Zwakman. This Dutch visual artist creates scenes, inspired by real life, and reconstructs them by memory in his studio. Landscape photography with the control of studio photography. The result is amazing. Life like scenes of what seems to be ordinary Dutch places. Perhaps a take on Dutch constructed landscapes. Every inch of it designed and thought of in an office. Controlled like Edwin does in his studio. Manipulation on a wide scale.

Edwin Zwakman’s website: www.edwinzwakman.nl

Form Integration

In the series “Habitat” Belgium photographer/artist Xavier Delory looks at prefab houses. House that can be found on the countryside of Belgium. And perhaps even in other western countries. One specific type of houses can be found here, called ‘Clé sur porte’. Or “Turnkey”. From which the definition is” Urban prefab cluster of similar forms implanted in the landscape without any effort of integration.

I look at the photographs and see visually interesting landscapes. Xavier depicts these houses almost as a representation of a social mega-trend. With little adjustments to the houses we see a closed up habitat were we, the individual, live our lives. Perhaps the words “without any effort of integration” says it all. We are all living in a society that builds on individuality by presenting us choices. And in the end the choices made per individual are not so different at all, yet we all feel unique. And all life our close-up lives without really trying to integrate.

Xavier Delory’s website: www.xavierdelory.be 

Sunday Vid – Denis Smith (Painting with Light)

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